By Sahan Weerakoon, deputy inside editor

Event of the week: Sunday, Jan. 24

CRASHfest will blow you away with an eclectic mix of sounds from the hottest indie bands. The House of Blues will be transformed into a world-class dance hall with three stages, luxurious lounge areas and studio-quality speakers so that you get the most premium listening experience possible. Bands include Angélique Kidjo, Kishi Bashi, The Dhol Foundation, Monsieur Periné, Debo Band, The Steel Wheels, Leyla McCalla Trio, Tongues in Trees, Session Americana and Zili Misik. Global street food, beer and custom cocktails will be served. 15 Lansdowne St.; 4:30 – 11:30 p.m.; $40.

Thursday, Jan. 21

Beer fans will be happy to know the Samuel Adams brewery will be hosting a sampling night of the latest Sam Adams Spring variety pack. Samuel Adams, winner of numerous craft beer awards, has been a classic Boston brand since the 1980s and is a must-try for all who visit. Much like their drinks, a Sam Adams tour is anything but bland. Offered flavors will include older favorites such as Scotch Ale and Noble Pils along with newer flavors such as Session Ale. Enjoy some live jazz by the Rusty Scott Quartet and try beer-infused snacks provided by Apotheker’s Kitchen. 30 Germania St.; 5:30 – 8 p.m.; $10; 21+

Friday, Jan. 22

“The Winter’s Tale” will be presented as the first show of the season at the Kenneth Branagh Theatre Company. The Shakespeare play is a tragedy about obsession and redemption. The play centers around the King Leontes, who seems to have everything going for him including money, power, friends and family. However, jealousy leads to a chain of tragic events. The play is directed by Tony-Award winning director Rob Ashford and Emmy-Award winning director Kenneth Branagh. It stars Branagh and Tony award-winning actress Judi Dench in the leading roles of King Leontes and his wife. 559 Washington St.; 7 p.m.; $16.

Saturday, Jan. 23

Support your local New England economy and agriculture by going to the Cambridge winter farmers market. This Saturday marks the fifth opening-day of the market. The annual celebration will have festivities for everyone to enjoy, such as live music from bluegrass band JackKnife Valentines and James McCarthy, an art project hosted by the Riverside Gallery, a photo booth and face painting. Valicenti Pastau, Winter Moon Roots and Copicut Farms will be acting as vendors. The market will be held inside the Cambridge Community Center, so take the Red Line in to join in on local grown goodness. 5 Callender St., Cambridge; 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.; free.

Monday, Jan. 25

Relive the 1990s in style with the Thomas Crane Public Library’s night of retro video games. Classic consoles such as the Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis and Nintendo 64 will be available along with iconic titles including Contra, Golden Axe, Golden Eye, Rampage, Joust and Double Dragon II. Newer consoles, such as the Wii, will also be available with favorites such as Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Mario Kart, New Super Mario Bros. and Street Fighter. All games are multiplayer so this event will be perfect for those on co-op in Quincy and in need of a non-alcoholic night out. 40 Washington St., Quincy.; 7 – 8:30 p.m.; free.

Tuesday, Jan. 26

The Brattle Theatre will be holding a screening of documentary “Waking in Oak Creek,” sponsored by the Pluralism Project at Harvard University. The movie centers around a Sikh Community in Oak Hill, Wis. that is struck by a hate attack during Sunday prayers. The film focuses on the importance of forgiveness as members of the Sikh youth seek to end violence and in their town. After the film, there will be a panel including executive producer Patrice O’Neill, teacher Pardeep Kaleka, whose father was killed inthe attack, and autthor Arno Michaelis, who used to be a violent white supremacist, and others. 40 Brattle St., Cambridge; 6:30 – 7:30 p.m.; free.

Wednesday, Jan. 27
“Violet,” an acclaimed off-Broadway show of the 1990s, is making a run in Boston at the Wimberly Theatre. In 1964, when a young woman is scarred on the face, she learns of a televangelist who can cure her ailment. She then embarks on a trip from her small town in North Carolina to Tulsa, Okla. to see him. Along the way, she meets two young soldiers who teach her about love, courage and the true meaning of beauty. “Violet” reaffirms the old saying that the journey is often more interesting than the destination. The play is directed by Paul Daigneault, founder of the SpeakEasy Stage Company, and stars Alison McCartan as Violet. 527 Tremont St.; 8 p.m.; $55.

Photo courtesy Luke Addison, Creative Commons