Event of the Week: Monday, Feb. 29

Whether it’s the Green Line, Orange Line or Red Line, the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) is both a source of Boston’s pain and pleasure – more often the former. Now, thanks to ImprovBoston, this lovable transportation system has its own musical. “T: An MBTA Musical” follows a group of three young people whose lives have been ruined by the aforementioned pain of the MBTA. But with the help of a secret map, they hatch a plan to reform everyone’s favorite transit system. Their journey is part drama, part love story and part scavenger hunt. Don’t miss your chance to hear classics like “The Shuttle Bus Song” in what BroadwayWorld.com calls the best new musical. 40 Prospect St., Cambridge; 10 p.m.; $25.

Thursday, Feb. 25

Berklee College of Music’s theater club is bringing together some of its best performers in its rendition of Tony Award-winning musical thriller, “Sweeney Todd.” Written by Stephen Sondheim and directed by Asher Denburg and Justin Gates, the musical is set in a 19th-century asylum and tells the story of barber who murders his customers. But the crimes don’t stop there. Todd robs all of his victims and with the help of his partner Mrs. Lovett, has their flesh baked into meat pies. The Berklee College rendition will include a 30-piece orchestra as well as a full cast ensemble. 136 Massachusetts Ave.; 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.; $12.

Friday, Feb. 26

No matter the generation, Disney has always left a prominent mark on everyone’s childhood. Laugh Boston and the creators of Boston’s Unscripted Musical Project seek to bring these classic stories to an adult audience with their new improv musical, “Dirty Disney.” In this raunchy twist, characters like Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck will be much cruder and ruder than you remember. The show will be also dictated by audience suggestions, so no two performances will be the same. Come relive your ruined childhood with “Dirty Disney.” 125 Summer St.; 11:30 p.m. – 1:30 a.m.; $20.

Saturday, Feb. 27

The South Asian Showdown celebrates its seventh anniversary this year and promises to be the biggest showdown yet. Twelve of the most talented Bollywood and dance fusion teams from across North America will be coming to Boston with the hope of walking away with a first-place trophy. Bollywood dance is unique in its expressions, brightly dressed performers and prominent use of hand gestures, while fusion combines features of Bollywood dance with other art forms. The Showdown will be taking place in the John Hancock Hotel, and features a performance by funk artists The Wonder Twins. 180 Berkeley St.; 6 – 9:30 p.m.; $20.

Sunday, Feb. 28

Don’t miss your chance to peruse some of the most unique works of clay art in Boston. The exhibition, All Fired Up: Contemporary Clay Sculpture, takes place at the Piano Craft Gallery and features more than 50 works from 21 artists. All artists hail from the local Feet of Clay studio in Brookline. Feet of Clay accommodates artists of all skill levels and backgrounds, so be prepared to see sculptures ranging in complexities and influences. A selection of the sculptures will also be available for sale. The exhibition is curated by Pares Mallis and Cary Rapaport. 793 Tremont St.; 1 – 6 p.m.; free.

Tuesday, Mar. 1

Internationally-recognized artist Walid Raad will be presenting his work in North America for the first time at the Institute of Contemporary Art. Raad uses photography, video and sculpture to showcase distinctions between fact and opinion in the way history is remembered and represented. Much of his work is influenced by his experiences growing up in a war-torn Lebanon and recent conflicts in the Middle East. The exhibition will feature works from the past 25 years and will run until Mar. 30. There will also be 55-minute presentations given in the gallery over the length of the exhibition. 100 Northern Ave.; 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.; free for Northeastern students.

Wednesday, Mar. 2

The end of the first World War saw a decline in German culture in America, despite Germans continuing to be the largest ethnic group at the time. In his most recent lecture, Burning Beethoven: The Eradication of German Culture in America during World War I, Reuters Berlin Correspondent, Erik Kirschbaum, presents an in-depth look into the lives of the 8 million Germans that lived in America, and especially those who lived in the third-largest German enclave, New York City. The lecture is co-presented with the American Council on Germany. 170 Beacon St.; 12 – 2 p.m; $10.

Photo courtesy Jon MountJoy, Creative Commons