By Sahan Weerakoon, deputy A&E editor

Thursday, April 14

Jose Mateo Ballet Theatre’s newest performance, “Hearts Disguised,” features three different ballets done in a cabaret style to bring out the romantic in everyone. The first ballet, “Schubert Adagio Mateo,” displays a story of love ringing with passion but with an untimely ending. “Courtly Lovers” then changes gear to a more casual, modern look at romance. Finally, “Timeless Attractions” strikes the audience with every facet of love represented in the ballet form. “Hearts Disguised” will run until April 17 at the Sanctuary Theatre. 400 Harvard St., Cambridge; 8 – 9:30 p.m.; $42.

Friday, April 15

Entrepreneurs will be excited to know that the TiE Startup Convention is coming to the Boston Marriott Copley Place. The convention is put on by TiE-Boston, which has more than 20 years of experience in entrepreneurship mentorship, education, fundraising and networking. However, the convention itself was established to bring together entrepreneurs with ideas in all stages of development so they can learn from each other and share their successes. Attendees can explore three tracks, including “Ideas & Innovate,” “Scale” and “What’s Hot in Tech, Cleantech, and Pharma.” The event will host several local startups with a networking lunch at the end. 110 Huntington Ave.; 7:30 a.m. – 8:30 p.m.; $69.

Saturday, April 16

For architecture buffs, the William Hickling Prescott House is a must-see. Built in 1808 and designed by Asher Benjamin, the house is one of a pair of twin houses that directly overlook the Boston Common. The Prescott House includes many features reminiscent of 19th century Boston, such as fluted Doric columns. The house also serves as a timeline of how homes in Beacon Hill have been redeveloped to meet changing needs. After Prescott’s death, the house was purchased by The National Society of the Colonial Dames which now uses the space to exhibit their costume collection and organize tours. 55 Beacon St.; noon – 4 p.m.; $7.

Sunday, April 17

The newest comedy by the Huntington Theatre Company, “Can you Forgive Her?” tells the story of sex, love and money intertwining people all in one crazy night. The play centers around 20-something Miranda who has been living the high life by tricking her two lovers. However, her scandals eventually catch up to her when one of her lovers threatens to kill her on Halloween night. She takes refuge in a stranger’s house – but one drink begins a whole new adventure. The play is written by two-time Pulitzer award finalist Gina Gionfriddo and is directed by Peter DuBois. It will run until April 24. 527 Tremont St.; 7:30 – 9 p.m.; $63.

Monday, April 18

Part of the original cast of iconic science fiction series “Star Wars,” Carrie Fisher inspired a generation of women to pursue acting. Following “Star Wars,” she accumulated an impressive list of acting credits, including cult classics, “The Blues Brothers” and “When Harry Met Sally.” As a result of her dedication to upholding and spreading scientific values, The Humanist Hub will present Fisher with its 10th annual Outstanding Lifetime Achievement award. The award will be presented at Memorial Church on the campus of Harvard University. Don’t miss your opportunity to hear from an acting legend. 1 Harvard Yard, Cambridge; 8 – 10 p.m.; $40.

Tuesday, April 19

Marijuana may be illegal, but Wicked Weed can be enjoyed by anyone (over 21, that is). Originally based in Asheville, N.C., this craft brewery is expanding into Massachusetts and is giving Boston residents a chance to taste their fares at The Independent bar before the official release. Owner and head brewer Walt Dickinson as well as national sales manager Evan Crutchfield will be on hand to talk to beer aficionados and introduce the kegs. Flavors include a tropical passion fruit Gose, Belgian blonde, sour ale, dry-hopped brett farmhouse ale and bourbon imperial stout. 75 Union Square, Somerville; 6 – 9 p.m.; free; 21+.

Wednesday, April 20

The newest exhibition at the Brookline Arts Center, “Conceptual Clay, Hot Art,” invited ceramic artists to submit provocative and inquisitive images in the form of clay. As a medium, clay allows colors to be seen in their full breadth, shapes to be held and textures to be felt. Juror Emily Zilber selected the pieces based on the aforementioned criteria as well as how the artists used clay to create functional objects and interdisciplinary tools. The exhibition will run until April 22. 86 Monmouth St., Brookline; 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.; free.

Photo courtesy Mostaque Chowdhury, Creative Commons