The independent student newspaper of Northeastern University

The Huntington News

The independent student newspaper of Northeastern University

The Huntington News

The independent student newspaper of Northeastern University

The Huntington News

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Springtime sentiments bloom at Franklin Park Zoo with orchid exhibit

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Quillan Anderson
A bright orange orchid glows against the black backdrop of the building’s walls. The blossoms were spread throughout the Tropical Forest zone, which features a variety of environments built for the different species of animals.

The Orchid Adventure at Franklin Park Zoo opened Feb. 2, boasting hundreds of flowers spotted around the zoo’s Tropical Forest zone.

The lively mix of flora and fauna brightened the overcast winter day and intrigued the families wandering the exhibit. Exotic birds flitted overhead, and toddlers stomped excitedly through the halls, surrounded by orange, pink and purple blossoms.

The display aims to celebrate and bring awareness to Franklin Park’s conservation efforts, especially during the zoo’s off-season. 

Orchids make up the largest family of flowering plants in the world, comprising more than 30,000 different species and over 200,000 hybrids. Featuring orchids from around the world, including varieties from South America, Madagascar and Southeast Asia, the Orchid Adventure is a brilliant display of this biodiversity. However, the park’s conservation efforts are not limited to animals and exotic flowers but extend to endangered plant life and species native to the state.

Massachusetts, designated as zone 6 on the United States Department of Agriculture’s Plant Hardiness Zone Map, relies on indoor cultivation or greenhouses to grow orchids. These conditions mean the bloom season for these plants typically begins in late winter, with buds beginning to open between January and March.

The vibrant blossoms are a sign of the coming spring, uplifting spirits and preparing Bostonians for brighter days ahead while winter weather melts away.

Included with the cost of admission, visitors are encouraged to explore the orchids during a day at the zoo. Anyone interested can visit two-toed sloths, ring-tailed lemurs and western lowland gorillas while surrounded by the beautiful blooms before the exhibit closes March 10.

About the Contributor
Quillan Anderson, Photo Editor
Quillan Anderson is a fourth-year journalism and political science student with a minor in photojournalism and working on her MS in media advocacy. This is her second semester as photo editor at the News, and she has previously served as deputy photo editor.
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