By Sahan Weerakoon, Deputy A&E Editor

Event of the Week: Wednesday, Mar. 23

In the Vagabond Theatre Company’s new play, “A Southern Victory,” the Confederacy has won The Civil War, and as as a result, slavery still thrives, prohibition continues and abolitionists known as John Brown’s Army have turned to violent, almost terrorist-like means to get their message across. The play, taking place at Boston Playwrights’ Theatre, centers on a college student named Thomas Williams who witnesses the terrorism firsthand and must decide whether to continue his family’s legacy as slave-owners or join the abolitionists. Directed by Kevin Mullins, “A Southern Victory,” will be presented as a trilogy. 949 Commonwealth Ave.; 8 – 10 p.m.; $20.

Thursday, Mar. 17

Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day right with a visit to the Cask ‘n Flagon. The Cask will host an all-day celebration complete with traditional Irish music and a dinner of corned beef and cabbage. There will also be four themed cocktails consisting of the fruity pot of gold made with Jameson Irish Whiskey  and peach schnapps, coffee-flavored chocolate Irishman-made with Jameson and Godiva liqueur, the extra-sweet green gummy bear made with Svedka vodka and Midori. For those looking for an extra-potent shot there is the green monster, a mix of Jameson Irish Whiskey and Bailey’s Irish cream. 62 Brookline Ave.; 11:00 a.m. – 11:30 p.m.; pay per drink; 21+.

Friday, Mar. 18

Continue the St. Patrick’s Day  festivities with the play “Another Fiddler of Inishbofin” at The Burren Irish Bar and Restaurant. The sequel to “The Fiddlers of Inishbofin,” Another Fiddler will introduce new scores of contemporary and traditional Irish music. The play follows up on the adventures of musician Tommy McCarthy and his troupe of fiddlers as they return to the isle of Inishbofin. There the fiddlers encounter their friend Liam, abandoned by his lover Fiona. However, Fiona’s sister Enya enters the story to bring Liam, Tommy and the other fiddlers a wild surprise. Directed by Pete Holm. 247 Elm St., Somerville; 7:30 – 9:30 p.m.; $30.

Saturday, Mar. 19

All Access Improv brings together some of Boston’s best comedians for 65 minutes of intense, unscripted comedy. The show is designed for all ages with performers from ImprovBoston’s popular show “fast-paced faceoff” and the troupe’s national touring company. Based in Cambridge, ImprovBoston has brought laughs to Boston for over 30 years, and All Access is their signature act.  The show combines acting with improvised songs and games for full audience interaction. For an immersive and high octane comedy experience, All Access is the only way to go. 40 Prospect St., Cambridge; 6 – 7 p.m.; $16.

Sunday, Mar. 20

Uforge Gallery presents its first open-call art exhibition “Art and Activism.” As an open-call exhibition, artists from around the city are invited to come, making it an excellent opportunity to look at local talent. The exhibition examines the use of art as a medium to advocate for political and social change. It also looks at the historical role of art in societal struggles. Artists use paintings, collages, photographs and sculpture to represent current issues ranging from racial injustice, feminism and even the upcoming presidential election. 767 Centre St., Jamaica Plain; 6 p.m.; free.

Monday, Mar. 21

“Planning the Improbable, Sketching the Impossible,” held at The Washington Street Gallery, looks at the artistic process and the different ways artists go about it. Ideas for unfinished works are presented in the form of concept drawings, maquettes, plans and proofs. The show focuses on artistic ambitions and the idea of breaking away from the physical and monetary constraints that leaves so many works of art hidden in a sketchbook. The show is curated by Mitch Shiles. 321D Washington St., Somerville; 12 – 4 p.m.; free.

Tuesday, Mar. 22

In her lecture “Ecology, Evolution and Species Diversification in Hawaiian Islands,” Rosemary Gillespie, professor of systematic entomology at the University of California Berkeley, discusses how the development of oceanic archipelagos allows for an ecosystem to be studied as a snapshot in time. Her research focuses on the evolution and ecology of spiders in Hawaii, as well as their interactions in the ecosystem. The lecture, held at the Harvard Museum of Natural History, also highlights the importance of ecological research in managing invasive species. 24 Oxford St., Cambridge; 6 – 7 p.m.; free.  

Photo Courtesy Bill Damon, Creative Commons