By Sahan Weerakoon, Deputy Arts and Entertainment Editor

Thursday, March 24

One of the Internet’s least-discussed contributions is the transformation of the pornography industry. In her lecture, “Playing with Sexnology,” psychiatrist and professor at the Boston Graduate School of Psychoanalysis, Frances Bidga-Peyton will present the effects of online porn, which comprises 13 percent of Internet searches. She will discuss the neurochemistry of cyberporn use, sex differences, the dangers of porn and treatments for addiction. Cyberporn addicts are encouraged to come, as the lecture will also serve as a workshop to evaluate subconscious fantasies underlying porn addiction. 1581 Beacon St., Brookline; 7 – 8:30 p.m.; free.   

Friday, March 25

In its newest exhibition, “The Private Jefferson: From the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society,” the Massachusetts Historical Society reveals what kind of man Thomas Jefferson really was. Unlike many exhibitions, it shows Jefferson’s private life in his carefully-crafted back-country Virginia home, Monticello. He is represented both as a slave owner and as a well-traveled Renaissance man who appeared happiest when away from the public eye. Don’t miss your chance to learn about America’s enigmatic third president. 1154 Boylston St.; 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.; free.

Saturday, March 26

Gardeners from all over Boston will convene at Northeastern University for Boston’s 41st annual Gardener’s Gathering. More than two dozen workshops will be available: From planting seeds and making sauerkraut to urban beekeeping and community and youth organizing. Attendees can also experience exhibitions from Boston agriculture associations. The gathering will kick off with a keynote address by David Ross, CEO of sustainability nonprofit Daisa Enterprises and visiting assistant professor of social entrepreneurship at Hampshire College. The keynote will be followed by a catered breakfast. 116 Forsyth St.; 11 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; $25.

Sunday, March 27

Anime Boston is this weekend and your chance to participate in New England’s biggest celebration of Japanese animations, comics and pop culture. It is one of the the fastest growing events of its kind in the country, starting in 2003 with 4,000 attendees and growing to more than 22,000 by 2012. The convention has also expanded to include music genres like J-Pop and J-Rock as well as more traditional segments of Japanese culture. Planned events include a masquerade, karaoke, game shows, anime panels and various video game, manga and anime booths. 900 Boylston St.; 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.; $60 – $65.

Monday, March 28

The Big Apple Circus is coming back to Beantown to put on its show, “The Grand Tour.” This performance will take viewers back in time to the roaring ’20s by staying true to the lavish style of the era and bringing together stunning acts from all over the world. Planes, trains and cars from the time will serve as the backdrop for the acts, that will be further supported by the talented seven-piece Big Apple Band. Big Apple Circus promises more acts and animal shows than ever before, so be prepared to cheer for an encore. 1 City Hall Square; 5 – 6:30 p.m.; $12.50 – $50.

Tuesday, March 29

For many Bostonians, “The Realish Housewives of Boston,” taking place at the Citi Shubert Theatre, may hit close to home. Created and written by comics Kate James and Tim Sniffen, the play is described in three words: Brawls, booze and botox. Much like the television series for which it is named, “Realish Housewives” has an eclectic group of characters including Ravonka, a baroness; Claudia Louis, a conniving debutante; Desiree, a neck model; and Gwen, the smart one. Follow the group along as they make headlines in Boston. 265 Tremont St.; 6 – 7:30 p.m.; $38.

Wednesday, March 30

Theatre Nohgaku brings classical Japanese Noh drama to an English speaking audience. Noh drama combines dance, chants, music and costumes to put on a very focused show. This performance in particular will have a traditional Noh, “Sumida River,” with English translations The show will be followed by a discussion on trauma and the arts. It will be presented in combination with BU’s Center for study in Asia, the College of Arts and Sciences department and women’s, gender and sexuality program. 685 Commonwealth Ave.; 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.; free.